Ledia Runnels' "World of Fantasy Fiction"











{April 7, 2012}   Russian Fairy Tales: “The Feather of Finist the Falcon” Part One
заставка к сказке перышко финист

заставка к сказке перышко финист (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One day, when the merchant set out for the Fair, he called his three daughters and asked: “My dear daughters, what do ye most desire me to buy for you?” The eldest answered, “Bring me a piece of rich brocade for a gown.” The second said, “Bring me a fine scarf for a shawl.” But the youngest replied: “Little father, bring me only a scarlet flower to set in my window.”

The two sisters laughed at her request. “Little fool,” they said, “what dost thou want of a scarlet flower? Thou wouldst better ask for a new apron.” But she paid no heed and when the merchant asked her again, she said: “Little father, buy for me only the scarlet blossom.”

The merchant bade them good-by and drove to the Fair, and whether in a short while or a long while, he came again to his house. He brought the rich brocade for the eldest daughter and the fine scarf for the second, but he quite forgot to bring the little scarlet flower. The eldest daughters were so rejoiced at their gifts that he felt sorry for his forgetfulness, and to comfort her, said to the youngest: “Never mind, I shall soon go again to the Fair, and shall bring thee a gift also.” And she answered: “It is no matter, little father; another time thou wilt remember.” And while her sisters, cutting and sewing their fine stuffs, laughed at her, she was silent.

Time passed, and again the merchant made ready to go to the Fair, and calling his daughters, he asked: “Well, my daughters, what shall I buy for you?” The eldest answered, “Bring me a gold chain,” and the second, “Buy me a pair of golden earrings”; but the third said, “Little father, I want nothing but a scarlet flower to set in my window.”

The merchant went to the Fair and he bought for the eldest daughter the chain and for the second the earrings, but again he forgot the scarlet flower. When he returned and the eldest two daughters took joy in their golden jewelry, he comforted the youngest as before, saying: “A simple flower is no great thing. Never mind. When I go again I shall bring thee a gift.” And again she answered: “It is no matter, little father; another time perhaps I shall be luckier.”

A third time the merchant made ready to go to the Fair, and called his three daughters and asked them what they most desired. The first answered, “Bring me a pair of satin shoes,” the second said, “Buy me a silken petticoat”; but the youngest said as before, “Little father, all my desire is for the scarlet flower to set in my window.”

(Continued… https://fairytalesbylediar.wordpress.com/2012/04/08/russian-fairy-tales-the-feather-of-finist-the-falcon-part-two/)

(The text came from: Wheeler, Post, Russian Wonder Tales, New York: The Century Company 1912.)

Enjoy!

Image Links:

The Feather of Finist the Falcon by Ivan Bilibin”                                                                                                                                                                               http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Bilibin

More Images of Ivan Bilibin’s art:                                                                                                                                                                                                                         https://www.google.com/search?q=ivan+bilibin+finist+the+falcon+images&hl=en&prmd=imvnso&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=1R6AT4uFBMiG2gX_v82EBw&sqi=2&ved=0CCMQsAQ&biw=1600&bih=775

Research Links:

“Sur La Lune Fairy Tales:Russian Wonder Tales”                                                                        http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/russian/russianwondertales/featherfinistfalcon.html

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