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Иллюстрация к сказке «Перышко Финиста Ясного С...

Иллюстрация к сказке «Перышко Финиста Ясного Сокола» (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As it happened before, so it befell that day also. Finist the Falcon had no for the girl who waited on him at table, and in the evening, sad and sorrowful, she went out to the blue sea-ocean, and sitting down on the soft sand, took out the golden hammer and the ten diamond nails and began to play with them. A little later the Tsar‘s daughter, with her maids and attendants, came walking along the beach, and seeing how the hammer drove the nails by itself, coveted the plaything and desired to buy it.

“It shall be thine,” said the girl, “if thou wilt pay me my price.”

“And what is the price?” asked the Tsar’s daughter.

“Let me watch a second night beside the bed of thy promised husband.”

“So be it,” said the Tsar’s daughter; and that night, after Finist the Falcon had fallen asleep, she put into his hair the enchanted pin, so that he could not waken, and brought the girl to his room. “Give me, now, the golden hammer and the diamond nails,” she said, “and thou mayest keep the flies from him till day-dawn.”

So that night, too, the merchant’s daughter leaned over her beloved through the long dark hours, weeping and crying to him: “Finist my love, my bright Falcon, awake and speak to me! I have come at last to thee! I have journeyed to the fiftieth Tsardom of the eightieth land, and have washed the blood from thy shirt with my tears!” But because of the enchanted pin Finist could not waken, and at day break the girl was sent back to her place in the kitchen.

When Finist came from his chamber, the Tsar’s daughter said: “Hast thou slept soundly, and art thou refreshed?”

He replied: “I slept, but it seemed to me that one I loved well bent over me, shedding bitter tears and begging me to arise, yet I could not wake. And because of this my own heart is heavy.”

And she said: “It was but a dream that today’s hunting will make thee speedily forget. No one was near thee while thou didst sleep.” So Finist the Falcon called for his horse and rode to the open steppe.

That day the merchant’s daughter wept and was exceeding sorrowful, for on the morrow Finist the Falcon was to be wed. “Never again shall I have the love of my bright falcon,” she thought. “Never more, because of my cruel sisters, may I call him to me with the little scarlet flower in my window!” When evening came, however, she dried her tears, sat down for a third time on the soft sand by the blue sea-ocean, and taking out the golden plate, set the diamond ball upon it. That evening also the Tsar’s daughter, with her serving-women, came walking on the beach, and as soon as she saw how the little diamond ball was rolling, rolling of itself, she coveted it and said: “Wilt thou sell these also for the same price thou didst ask for thy other playthings?”

(Continued… )

(The text came from: Wheeler, Post, Russian Wonder Tales, New York: The Century Company 1912.)

Enjoy!

Image Links:

The Feather of Finist the Falcon by Ivan Bilibin”                                                                                                                                                                               http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Bilibin

More Images of Ivan Bilibin’s art:                                                                                                                                                                                                                         https://www.google.com/search?q=ivan+bilibin+finist+the+falcon+images&hl=en&prmd=imvnso&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=1R6AT4uFBMiG2gX_v82EBw&sqi=2&ved=0CCMQsAQ&biw=1600&bih=775

Research Links:

“Sur La Lune Fairy Tales:Russian Wonder Tales” http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/russian/russianwondertales/featherfinistfalcon.html

Legend of the Tengu Prince — Finally Available on Amazon.com!

http://creativemusingsoflediar.com/2012/04/15/legend-of-the-tengu-prince-finally-available-on-amazon-com/

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Иллюстрация к сказке «Перышко Финиста Ясного С...

Иллюстрация к сказке «Перышко Финиста Ясного Сокола» (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So the merchant’s daughter entered the Palace and was given a humble place among the servants, and when Finist the Falcon sat him down to dine, she put the food before him with her own hands. But he, moody and longing for his lost love, sat without raising his eyes and never so much as saw her or guessed her presence.

After dinner, sad and lonely, she went out to the sea beach and sitting down on the soft sand, took her little silver spindle and began to draw out a thread. And in the-cool of the evening the Tsar‘s daughter, with her attendants, came walking there and seeing that the thread that came from the spindle was of pure gold, said to her: “Maiden, wilt thou sell me that plaything?”

“If thou wilt buy it at my price,” answered the girl.

“And what is thy price?” asked the Tsar’s daughter.

“Let me sit through one night by the side of thy promised husband,” said the girl.

Now the Tsar’s daughter was cold and deceitful, and desired Finist the Falcon, not because she loved him, but because of his beauty and her own pride. “There can be no harm in that,” she thought, “for I will put in his hair an enchanted pin, by reason of which he will not waken, and with the spindle I can cover myself and my little mother with gold.” So she agreed, and that night when Finist the Falcon was asleep, she put in his hair the enchanted pin, brought the girl to his room, and said: “Give me now the spindle, and in return thou mayest sit here till daybreak and keep the flies from him.”

All night the girl bent over the bed where the handsome youth lay sleeping, and wept bitter tears. “Awake and rise, Finist, my bright Falcon,” she cried. “I have come at last to thee. I have left my little father and my cruel sisters, and I have searched through three times nine lands and a hundred Tsardoms for thee, my beloved!” But Finist slept on and heard nothing, and so the whole long night passed away.

And with the dawn came the Tsar’s daughter and sent the girl back to the kitchen, and she took away the enchanted pin so that Finist the Falcon should awaken.

When he came from his chamber, the Tsar’s daughter said to him: “Hast thou rested well, and art thou refreshed?”

He answered: “I slept, but it seemed to me that someone was beside me all night, weeping and lamenting and beseeching me to awaken, yet I could not arouse myself, and because of that my head is heavy.”

And she said: “Thou wert but dreaming! No one has been beside thee!” So Finist the Falcon called for his horse and betook himself to the open steppe a-hunting.

(Continued… https://fairytalesbylediar.wordpress.com/2012/04/18/russian-fairy-tales-the-feather-of-finist-the-falcon-part-nine/)

(The text came from: Wheeler, Post, Russian Wonder Tales, New York: The Century Company 1912.)

Enjoy!

Image Links:

The Feather of Finist the Falcon by Ivan Bilibin”                                                                                                                                                                               http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Bilibin

More Images of Ivan Bilibin’s art:                                                                                                                                                                                                                         https://www.google.com/search?q=ivan+bilibin+finist+the+falcon+images&hl=en&prmd=imvnso&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=1R6AT4uFBMiG2gX_v82EBw&sqi=2&ved=0CCMQsAQ&biw=1600&bih=775

Research Links:

“Sur La Lune Fairy Tales:Russian Wonder Tales” http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/russian/russianwondertales/featherfinistfalcon.html

Legend of the Tengu Prince — Finally Available on Amazon.com!

http://creativemusingsoflediar.com/2012/04/15/legend-of-the-tengu-prince-finally-available-on-amazon-com/



Ivan Bilibin 031

Ivan Bilibin 031 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“O Grandmother,” she answered, “grant me a kindness. Be my hostess and shield me from the dark night! I go to find Finist the Falcon, my dearest friend, whom my sisters pierced with cruel needles and knife-blades, and drove away bleeding.”
dame.

“He is a relative of mine,” said the old woman, “and his home is not very far from here. But come in and rest this night; the morning is wiser than the evening.”

So the girl entered and ate and drank what the old woman gave her, and slept till daybreak, when the other woke her and said: “Finist the Falcon with colored feathers is now in the next Tsardom from here, beside the blue sea-ocean, where he stays at the Palace, for in three days he is to marry the Tsar‘s daughter. Go now with God and take with thee this golden saucer and this little diamond ball. Set the ball on the plate and it will roll of itself. Mayhap thou wilt wish to give them as a wedding-gift to his bride.”

She thanked the old woman and started again on her way, and in the afternoon she came to the blue sea-ocean spreading wide and free before her, and beside it she saw a Palace with high towers of white stone whose golden tops were glowing like fire. Near the Palace a black serving-wench was washing a piece of cloth in the sea, whose waves it tinged with red, and the girl said: “What is it thou dost cleanse?”

The servant answered: “It is a shirt of Finist the Falcon, who in three days will wed my mistress, but it is so stained with blood that I can by no means make it clean.” The girl thought, “It is a garment my beloved wore after he was so cruelly wounded by the knives in my window!” And taking it from the other’s hands, she began to weep over it, so that the tears washed away every stain and the shirt was as white as snow.

The black serving-woman took the shirt back to the Tsar’s daughter, who asked her how she had so easily cleansed it, and the woman answered that a beautiful maiden, alone on the sea sand, had wept over it till her tears had made it white. “This is, in truth, a remarkable thing,” said the Tsar’s daughter; “I would see this girl whose tears can wash away such stains.” And summoning her maids and nurses and attendants, she went walking along the shore.

Presently she came where the merchant’s daughter sat alone on the soft sand gazing sorrowfully out over the blue sea-ocean, and she accosted her and said: “What grief hast thou that thy tears can wash away blood?”

“I grieve,” answered the girl, “because I so long to see the beautiful Finist the Falcon.”

Then the Tsar’s daughter, being very prideful, tossed her head, saying: “Is that all? Go to the Palace kitchen, and I will let thee serve there; perchance as payment thou mayest catch a glimpse of him as he dines.”

(Continued… )

(The text came from: Wheeler, Post, Russian Wonder Tales, New YorkThe Century Company 1912.)

Enjoy!

Image Links:

The Feather of Finist the Falcon by Ivan Bilibin”                                                                                                                                                                               http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Bilibin

More Images of Ivan Bilibin’s art:                                                                                                                                                                                                                         https://www.google.com/search?q=ivan+bilibin+finist+the+falcon+images&hl=en&prmd=imvnso&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=1R6AT4uFBMiG2gX_v82EBw&sqi=2&ved=0CCMQsAQ&biw=1600&bih=775

Research Links:

“Sur La Lune Fairy Tales:Russian Wonder Tales” http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/russian/russianwondertales/featherfinistfalcon.html

Legend of the Tengu Prince — Finally Available on Amazon.com!

http://creativemusingsoflediar.com/2012/04/15/legend-of-the-tengu-prince-finally-available-on-amazon-com/



Ivan Bilibin 086

Ivan Bilibin 086 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The old woman gave the girl to eat and drink, a portion of all God had given her, and a bed to sleep on, and in the morning when the dawn began to break, she awoke her. “Finist, who flies as the falcon with colored feathers,” she said, “is now in the fiftieth Tsardom of the eightieth land from here. He has recently proposed marriage to a Tsar‘s daughter. Thou mayest, perhaps, reach there in time for the wedding-feast. Take thou this silver spindle; when thou usest it, it will spin thee a thread of pure gold. Thou mayest give it to his wife for a wedding-gift. Go now with God across three times nine lands to the house of my second cousin. I am bad-tempered but she is worse than I. However, speak her fair and she may direct thee further.”

The girl thanked the old woman and bidding her fare well, set out again, though with a heavier heart, on her journey. She walked and walked, whether for a short time or a long time, across green steppe and barren wilderness, until at length, when a second pair of iron shoes were worn through, a second staff broken to pieces and a second stone church-loaf gnawed away, she came one evening, on the edge of a swamp, to a little hut on whose door-step sat a second old woman, sourer than the first.

“Whither goest thou, lovely girl?” asked the dame.

“O Grandmother,” she answered, “grant me thy kindness. Be my hostess and protect me from the dark night. I seek my dear friend, who is called Finist the Falcon, whom my cruel sisters wounded and drove from me.”

“He is a relative of mine,” said the old woman, “but thou wilt have to walk many versts further to find him. He is to marry a Tsar’s daughter and today is her last maiden feast. But enter and rest. The morning is wiser than the evening.”

The old woman put food and drink before her and gave her a place to sleep. Early on the morrow she woke her. “Finist the Falcon,” she said, “lives in the fiftieth land from here. Take with thee this golden hammer and these ten little diamond nails. When thou usest them, the hammer will drive the nails of itself. If thou choosest thou mayest give them to his wife for a wedding-gift. Go now with God to the house of my fourth cousin. I am crabbed but she is more ill-tempered than I. However, greet her with politeness and perhaps she will direct thee further. She lives across three times nine lands, beside a deep river.”

The girl took the golden hammer and the ten little diamond nails, thanked the old woman and went on her way. She walked a long way and she walked a short way, and at last, when the third pair of iron shoes were worn through, and the third iron staff broken to pieces and the third stone church-loaf gnawed away, she came, in a dark wood where the tops of the trees touched the sky, to a deep river and on its hank stood a little hut, on whose door-step sat a third old woman, uglier and sourer than the other two put together.

(Continued… https://fairytalesbylediar.wordpress.com/2012/04/16/russian-fairy-tales-the-feather-of-finist-the-falcon-part-seven/)

Enjoy!

Image Links:

The Feather of Finist the Falcon by Ivan Bilibin”                                                                                                                                                                               http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Bilibin

More Images of Ivan Bilibin’s art:                                                                                                                                                                                                                         https://www.google.com/search?q=ivan+bilibin+finist+the+falcon+images&hl=en&prmd=imvnso&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=1R6AT4uFBMiG2gX_v82EBw&sqi=2&ved=0CCMQsAQ&biw=1600&bih=775

Research Links:

“Sur La Lune Fairy Tales:Russian Wonder Tales” http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/russian/russianwondertales/featherfinistfalcon.html



I am doing research for a new book that takes place in Kiev, Ukraine. In my search I came across these awesome Russian fairy tales that I will share each day with you. Find the first part of the second story below:

Marya Morevna

Once a long time ago there was a kingdom ruled by a young tsar named Ivan. He had three sisters, Maria, Olga and Anna. Their father, just before he died, asked Ivan to take good care of them.Once when Ivan was walking in the garden with his sister Maria, there was a clap of thunder and a falcon appeared out of the sky. He landed, turned into a handsome young prince, and asked Maria’s hand in marriage. Ivan gave his blessing and the two were married.The same thing happened with his other two sisters: Olga married an eagle and Anna married a raven, and all three girls went away to their husbands’ kingdoms.One day Tsar Ivan decided to visit his sisters. On the way he saw the wonderful palaceof a beautiful warrior-princess named Marya Morevna. He stayed there as a guest for several days.  The two fell in love with each other and married.

One morning Marya Morevna went to fight with her enemies. She gave him the keys to all the rooms in her palace, but warned him, “Don’t go to the dark room in the cellar.” But after she left, his curiosity got the better of him and he unlocked the door.

Inside, he saw Koshchey the Deathless chained to the wall. Koshchey begged him, “Give me some water, please. I am so thirsty.”

The kind Tsar Ivan felt sorry for him and gave him three pails of water. Koshchey became strong, broke his heavy chains and laughed, “Thank you, Prince Ivan. But from now on you will not see your beloved Marya Morevna any more.”

Koshchey flew away like a storm and Tsar Ivan wept.Ivan was determined to find his beloved wife. On his journey he visited his sister Maria and her husband the hawk and told them everything that had happened.

The hawk said, “It will be very difficult to find Marya Morevna and take her from Koshchey. Give us your silver spoon. We will look at the spoon and think of you. If it turns black, we will know something terrible has happened.”

After that Ivan visited his sister Olga and the eagle. He left them his silver fork.

Ivan then went to the home of his sister Anna and the raven and gave them his silver knife. Tsar Ivan journeyed for a year and a day and at last came to the palace of Koshchey, who was away from home.

Marya Morevna was very happy to see Prince Ivan. He said, “I am so sorry that I didn’t listen to you and that I set Koshchey free. But now I want you to go with me; maybe he can’t overtake us.”

But Koschey did overtake them and cut Ivan into small pieces. Koshchey took Marya Morevna back to his palace.At the same time Ivan’s brothers-in-law saw that his spoon, fork and knife had turned black and they knew something terrible had happened to Tsar Ivan.

The hawk, eagle and raven found him and revived him with the Water of Life. He thanked them and went away in search of Marya Morevna again.

(Continued…  https://fairytalesbylediar.wordpress.com/2012/04/02/russian-fairy-tales-marya-morevna-part-two/)

(If you like what you read here, you might also enjoy “Creative Musings” http://creativemusingsoflediar.com/, another blog of creative writing.)

Enjoy!

Links:

Russian Folklore” http://stpetersburg-guide.com/folk/ilya.shtml

“One of Kyives Oldest Tress” http://explorationart.wordpress.com/2012/03/25/one-of-kyives-oldest-trees/



et cetera